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Siliconeer | May 2014

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Siliconeer | May 2014 | 15 www.siliconeer.com over $1,000 through door-to-door fund- raising and car washes. We currently have a fundraiser go- ing on at Dilworth Elementary School, Charlotte, North Carolina, and Sedgwick Elementary School in Cupertino, Calif. We've received support from San Jose Councilmember, Ash Kalra and presi- dent of Build African Schools, Patrick O' Sullivan. (Above): The school we will build will look like this. It will cost 75,000 dollars and it will include bathrooms, electricity, running water, and even laptops. be used as fishing nets. Multiple people died since the chemicals that would kill the mosquitoes got into the fish they ate. We believe that with the proper edu- cation, they would have been more aware and could have made the right decision. By giving the African kids an edu- cation we are giving them the tools they need to fix these problems that they face. Department of Labor and U.S. Bureau of Statistics shows that Americans waste $146 billion on energy and $165 billion on food each year. Take this amount and divide it by how many Americans there are and you get $466.45 and $527.16 respectively. Put it together and you get $993.61. This is how much American families waste per year on food and energy, but keep in mind ◀ from PreVIoUS Page With all the problems in Africa and all the struggles that the kids face, the most important thing is that we take a step back and compare what we have with what African children have; just to get an understanding of what these kids in Africa face. One problem that these kids face, that we can relate to the most, is hunger. Living on $1.25 a day is similar to eating 1/12 of a burger for lunch. After working in the hot fields for hours, these children come back to their rickety home to eat something we might feed the birds on a summer day. 1/12 of a burger leads to multiple problems such as malnutrition and starvation which can only be fixed by a root cause. But looking at what the kids don't have and what we do have is only one part of the story; the second part is looking at what we waste that can help the suffer- ing kids in Africa. A study by the U.S. however that this information is pertain- ing to food and energy and doesn't include the other ways in which Americans waste money like candy and soda expenses. Taking all this in mind TeachThe- Future Foundation believes that it is our duty to educate all the kids in poverty and give them what they deserve. So our project is to build a school in Africa for $75,000. The school will include bath- rooms, electricity, running water, and laptops. You can help these kids in Africa get the education that deserve, by going on our website: teachthefuturefoundation. org and click on the donate button on our home page. Donating to TeachTheFuture Foun- dation is a donation for a better future. Please help us and our cause of providing education to kids in poverty by donating however much you feel. As Americans, we tend to waste so much money and at TeachTheFuture Foundation, we believe that this money could be distributed for the betterment of those in poverty. Donate now and to- gether we can unite to give education to those in poverty. Let's change the world one step at a time. PATrIck O' SUllIvAn By solving the problem of education, there will be more jobs, more doctors to prevent disease, more wealth, and more overall happiness for the people. Over 80 million African kids will never receive a formal education. That's why we, three 9 th grade students from Lynbrook High School, came together to form an official Non-Profit Organiza- tion called TeachTheFuture Foundation. What differentiates us from other nonprofits is that we are founded and completely run by high school students. Our mission as a nonprofit organization is to better improve the lives of those in poverty by giving them an education. We believe that no one should be denied an education because of their wealth. We started a project to build a school in Kenya, Africa and we hope that this school will help improve the lives of the kids in African Communities. We've started fundraising and we've received

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